The Trans Mountain Pipeline benefits all Canadians.

The time to act is now.

Today, the national government’s authority to approve national projects that are in the national interest is being challenged by the Government of British Columbia. Canadians can’t let this stand. That’s why we’re asking our leaders to take action and get this vital infrastructure built.

Small expansion. Substantial results.


As the only federally regulated pipeline with access to Canada’s West Coast, the Trans Mountain Pipeline is vital to getting oil to new markets. Built in 1953, the Trans Mountain Pipeline’s capacity has previously been increased through twinning parts of the line and adding associated facilities. In response to market demand and export opportunity, the proposed Trans Mountain Pipeline Extension Project will fully twin the 1,150-kilometre pipeline route and more than double capacity.

The $7.4 billion construction project will take two years and will use the existing pathway for 73% of the route, 16% of the route will follow other infrastructure such as telecom, hydro and highways, and the remaining 11% will be new right-of-way.

Photo of Rachel Notley.

In today’s uncertain world, our energy industry is critical to every Canadian’s economic security and stability. That is why it is so important that Canada be able to reach new markets for its most valuable commodity.


Rachel Notley
Premier of Alberta

Canada’s economy and national climate plan need the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion.

But they’re both at risk if the project is cancelled.

Billions of dollars for the economy.


$46.7
billion

The amount of revenue the pipeline will generate for the economy over the next 20 years.

Creating jobs for Canadians.


37,000

The number of direct, indirect and induced jobs created per year of the pipeline’s operation.

Protecting the environment.


157 & 37

The number of conditions Trans Mountain is subject to by the National Energy Board and BC Government respectively.

Support from Indigenous communities.


43

The number of Indigenous groups who have signed $400 million in Mutual Benefit Agreements.

Alberta’s Climate Leadership Plan leads the way.


100
megatonnes

Alberta’s voluntary emissions limit – the only jurisdiction in the world to make such a commitment.

zero.

The number of spills from tanker operations since Trans Mountain began loading marine vessels with petroleum over 60 years ago.

Photo of Ernie Crey.

If this project doesn’t go through, it’ll hurt our people… (The Trans Mountain Pipeline) will provide a major leg out of poverty.


Ernie Crey
Chief,
Cheam First Nation